Here is where you will find our growing list of artisans; weavers, leather workers, and the like.

For details about our experiences with our artisans, please check out our blog.

INTRODUCING:

Our Weavers

Lu People

Sapa Vietnam

Lu are a unique, remote group located in the northern mountains of Vietnam. They are distinguished by their black teeth dyed with a black-honey shrub and benzoin resin paste. Before getting married, all Lu girls must know how to weave and the bride-to-be spends a whole year making her dress. Fabrics used to make clothes are dyed in indigo for 7 days; dyed and dried twice a day, until they are finally dyed black. The weaves used on the skirts, which are featured on The Day to Night Bags, can take a highly-experienced weaver up to 6 months to both weave and embroider a completed pattern.

Cham People

Cham Loom

Cham use two types of traditional looms; the ‘daneng aban khan’, which produces wide cloth sheets, and the ‘daneng jihdalah’, which produces longer and narrower cloth sheets. Cham people are experts in dyeing their textiles in a wide variety of colors via natural dyes extracted from leaves, rind, stems and roots of plants that can be found in the nearby forests. However lately, most prefer buying colored threads from the market, instead of cultivating cotton, spinning it and dyeing the threads themselves. We use these weaves on our Cham Totes and sell these by the yard. Read our blog on the history of weaving for more information.

Mrs. Diem

Mrs. Diem

Mrs. Diem

Mrs. Diem is from My Nghiep Village in Ninh Thuan Province, Vietnam. She runs the local culture centre and is responsible for making some of the Cham weaves you see featured in our bags. Mrs. Diem learned how to weave at the age of ten by her mother, Mrs. Trao. She was kind enough to whip us up some instant noodle when we arrived in the village after a long train ride. Thank Mrs. Diem!

Mrs. Nga

Mrs. Nga

Mrs. Nga

Mrs. Nga is also from My Nghiep Village and weaves in the weaving workshop. She learned how to weave at the age of ten and now is extremely skilful in weaving detailed motifs like the Shiva pattern above.

Mrs. Trao

Mrs. Trao

Mrs. Trao

Mrs. Trao is from My Nghiep Village as well and is responsible for managing the weaving workshop. She learned how to weave at the age of twelve and now is a weaving veteran with a lot of experience. Mrs. Trao was very open about Cham culture and allowed us to record her whilst we asked questions.

Our Leather Worker

Mr. Viet

Wild Tussah Artisan

Mr. Viet

Mr. Viet, who is Chinese-Vietnamese, has been making leather handbags for over 20 years. He originally had to teach himself leather craftsmanship as it was kept secret amongst other bag makers in Vietnam years a go. After a long time practicing and patiently learning, he now is an expert and one of the most experienced bag makers in Ho Chi Minh City.

Mr. Viet is a quiet man, but you can easily see the joy he gets from our reactions when we see our bags come to life.

Wild Tussah Artisan Wild Tussah Artisan

Wild Tussah Artisan Wild Tussah Artisan

My Nghiep Cham Weaving Village

My Nghiep Village

Ox & Cart Rice Transportation

 

Cham School

My Nghiep Village School

 

Vietnam

Traditional Cham Mud House

 

Cham Loom

A Loom Being Set Up at a Local’s House

 

Cham Weaving Workshop

Weaving Workshop

 

Mrs. Nga & Shiva Pattern

Mrs. Nga Weaving a Shiva Pattern at the Weaving Workshop

 

Cham Weaving Workshop

Danica Looking at the Cham Weaves in the Workshop